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WHAT'S IN A NAME?

WHEN IT COMES TO CHAMPAGNE, MAYBE EVERYTHING.

JAN 10, 2024

Fun Facts. All genuine Champagnes must spend at least 15 months maturing in the winemaker's cellars before release. Vintage cuvées are matured for at least three years. In practice, this statutory timeframe - already significant compared to other sparkling wines - is nearly always longer in Champagne: 2-3 years for non-vintage wines and 4-10 years for vintage Champagne.

After the second fermentation stage, the bottles are taken down to the cellars where, undisturbed and protected from light, they will embark on a long period of maturation. This is what is known as maturation on lees. The lees consist of yeasts that have multiplied in the bottle.

1

Mailly Grand Cru
 

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2

Mailly Grand Cru
 

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